Difference Between Amid and Amidst

Amid vs Amidst

Amid and Amidst are two words that are often confused when it comes to the appearing similarity between their meanings. There is, of course, subtle difference between them. The word ‘amid’ is normally used in the sense of ‘in the middle of’. On the other hand, the word ‘amidst’ is used in the sense of ‘accompanied by’. This is the subtle and the main difference between the two words.

Take a look at the two sentences given below

1. The friends reached their home amid heavy rain.

2. He could move slowly amid the crowd.

In both the sentences, you can see that the word ‘amid’ is used in the sense of ‘in the middle of’ and hence, the meaning of the first sentence would be ‘the friends reached their home in the middle of heavy rain’, and the second sentence would be ‘he could move slowly in the middle of the crowd’.

It is interesting to note that the word ‘amid’ is used as an adverb. On the other hand, observe the two sentences,

1. The minister reached the place amidst tight security.

2. The lady entered the house amidst tight police security.

In both the sentences, you can find that the word ‘amidst’ is used in the sense of ‘accompanied by’ and hence, the meaning of the first sentence would be ‘the minister reached the place accompanied by tight security’, and the second sentence could be rewritten as ‘the lady entered the house accompanied by tight police security’.

It is important to know that the word ‘amidst’ is used as an adverb that describes an action. It is chiefly used in written English rather than spoken English’. These are the main differences between the two important, but yet confusing words, namely, amid and amidst.

  • Piotr

    Sorry, utter bollocks. They mean the same thing, but one is archaic. The end.

  • Grammar Cop

    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong. You made this stuff up. Every reference source I can find says that “amid” and “amidst” mean exactly the same thing. There are no “subtle differences,” as you incorrectly state. And they are not adverbs. They’re prepositions. You are not qualified to be writing articles like this.