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Difference Between Due to and Because of

Due to vs Because of

Due to and Because of are two types of usage in English language that show differences between them when it comes to their application in both written and spoken language. The expression ‘due to’ is generally used in the sense of ‘on account of’. On the other hand, the expression ‘because of’ is used in the sense of ‘for the reason that’. This is the main difference between the two expressions, namely, ‘due to’ and ‘because of’.

Take a look at the two sentences given below,

1. The match was abandoned due to heavy rain.

2. The villagers suffered due to famine.

In both the sentences, the expression ‘due to’ is used in the sense of ‘on account of’, and hence the meaning of the first sentence would be ‘the match was abandoned on account of heavy rain’, and the meaning of the second sentence would be ‘the villagers suffered on account of famine’.

It is interesting to note that a sentence can begin with ‘due to’ too as in the examples,

1. Due to lack of attendance the student was not allowed to sit for the examination.

2. Due to fever Francis could not attend the function.

You can see that both the sentences begin with ‘due to’. On the other hand, take a look at the following sentences,

1. Many children in the country died because of poverty.

2. The country suffered heavy loss because of earthquake.

In both the sentences, the expression ‘because of’ is used in the sense of ‘for the reason that’, and hence the meaning of the first sentence would be ‘many children in the country died for the reason that of poverty’, and the meaning of the second sentence would be ‘the country suffered heavy loss for the reason that of earthquake’

On the other hand, it is wrong to begin a sentence with ‘because of’. If a sentence begins with ‘because of’ then the sentence is construed to be grammatically wrong. It is important to know that the expression ‘because of’ is used whenever the speaker is intent on telling a reason for some happening or event.

On the other hand, the expression ‘due to’ is used whenever the speaker is intent on giving a consequence. Look at the following sentences,

1. Francis got into a problem due to lack of proper preparation.

2. Angela slipped into coma due to brain hemorrhage.

In the first sentence, the speaker is intent on telling the other person about the consequence of the lack of proper preparation. Likewise, in the second sentence the speaker is intent on telling the other person about the consequence of brain hemorrhage.

As a matter of fact, both the expressions, namely, ‘due to’ and ‘because of’ are excessively used in spoken English rather than in written English. In written English, these two expressions are substituted by the expressions ‘on account of’ and ‘as a consequence of’. These are the differences between the two expressions, ‘due to’ and ‘because of’.


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