Difference Between Job Analysis and Job Design

Job Analysis vs Job Design
 

Job analysis and job design are concepts very closely related to one another. Job design follows job analysis, and the purpose of both job analysis and design is to create the best fit among the company’s needs and individual with the right skills, knowledge, and capabilities to deliver to those needs. Due to their similarities, they oftentimes confused to be the same. Nevertheless, the concepts are quite different to one another. The article takes a closer look at each concept and explains the similarities and differences.

Job Analysis

Job analysis involves the evaluation and analysis of a job, in terms of the tasks, responsibilities, skills, tools, knowledge and expertise required to fulfill the job requirement successfully. These factors help determine the demands of the specific job and the skills and abilities that the employee must possess in order to complete the job successfully. Job analysis aids in creating job descriptions, selecting and recruiting employees, training and development, conducting performance evaluations, etc.

Job analysis will help the firm to identify the perfect job for the individual, or the right individual for a specific job that has special demands. Job analysis will also help the HR managers determine what compensation should be paid to the employees, help in assessing gaps in training, and can result in better policies to fulfill the overall organizational goals. There are a number of ways in which job analysis can be done. This includes observing the individual at work, conducting interviews (individual and group), questionnaires, and using various logging methods such as diaries and other records.

Job Design

Job design is a step that follows job analysis and is the process in which the work is structured, and specific tasks and responsibilities are designated to individuals or groups. Job design dictates the manner in which work tasks are arranged, to arrive at the maximum efficiency and optimal outcomes. There are a number of components of job design, including; job scope – various tasks to be performed and responsibilities to be taken on, and job depth – the autonomy that the employee enjoys in taking ownership and responsibility of their work.

A good job design will take into consideration the performance goals that need to be fulfilled and the skills and capabilities required in an employee. Other aspects of job design include job enlargement, job rotation and job enrichment. Job enlargement is done when the amount and variety of work that needs to be completed is increased, which will in turn provide workers with opportunities to learn and develop further. Job rotation will allow workers to change jobs and to become proficient in a number of job roles. Job enrichment is when the employee is given more opportunities for higher achievement and responsibility and is used as a way to motivate employees and improve job satisfaction.

Job Analysis vs Job Design

Job analysis and job design are quite similar to one another as they are both closely observe the manner in which various job tasks are arranged. Job analysis leads to job design and the manner in which the job is to be completed cannot be determined without understanding what is to be done. Job analysis and job design have a major difference in terms of their purpose. Job design is about creating a job by arranging work tasks to arrive at the maximum efficiency and optimal outcomes, by taking into consideration the goals of the organization and skills and capabilities needed to fulfill those goals. Job analysis involves the evaluation and analysis of a job, in terms of the tasks, responsibilities, skills, tools, knowledge and expertise and is oftentimes used as in input when creating the job design.

Summary:

Difference Between Job Analysis and Job Design

• Job design dictates the manner in which work tasks are arranged to arrive at the maximum efficiency and optimal outcomes.

• Job analysis involves the evaluation and analysis of a job, in terms of the tasks, responsibilities, skills, tools, knowledge and expertise required to fulfill the job requirements successfully.

• Job design follows job analysis, and the purpose of both job analysis and design is to create the best fit among the company’s needs and individual with the right skills, knowledge and capabilities to deliver to those needs.