Difference Between Kale and Collard Greens

Kale vs Collard Greens
 

It is quite hard to discern the true difference between cooking greens sometimes and Kale and Collard Greens is no exception. As a part of  the same cultivar group, Acephala of the Brassica oleracea species, it must also be mentioned that kale and collard greens are also almost genetically identical which makes figuring out the differences between the two greens even more difficult.

What is Kale?

Also known as borecole and scientifically known as Brassica oleraceaAcephala Group, kale is a type of cabbage available in light green, green, dark green, violet-green or violet-brown colours. There are five kale varieties that are classified according to the leaf type; curly-leaved, plain-leaved, Rape kale, leaf and spear and CavoloNeru also known as  Tuscan Cabbage , black cabbage, Tuscan Kale, Lacinato and dinosaur kale.

Kale, high in calcium, vitamin K, vitamin C, and beta carotene, is also known for the amount of indole-3-carbinol. Indole-3-carbinol boosts DNA repair in cells. As a result, it blocks the growth of cancer cells. Kale is also known for lowering cholesterol and decreasing the absorption of dietary fat.

Tender green kale is a popular addition in salads as it contributes with an intense flavour while when dehydrated or baked, it resembles the consistency of a potato chip.Because of this, kale chips are quite popular as a healthy snack. Many a dish is made with the contribution of kale. Colcannon  from Ireland, the Tuscan soup ribollita, caldoverde from Portugal, ugali from the eastern African Great Lakes region are among the myriad of dishes that can be prepared with kale.  Kale is reduced in flavour considerably when combined with lemon juice or oils and is known to taste sweet and more flavourful once it has been exposed to frost.

Kale, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt

Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)

Energy

117 kJ (28 kcal)

Carbohydrates

5.63 g

   – Sugars

1.25 g

   – Dietary fiber

2 g

Protein

1.9 g

Vitamin A equiv.

681 μg (85%)

   – beta-carotene

8173 μg (76%)

Vitamin B6

0.138 mg (11%)

Vitamin C

41 mg (49%)

Vitamin E

0.85 mg (6%)

Vitamin K

817 μg (778%)

Calcium

72 mg (7%)

Iron

0.9 mg (7%)

Manganese

0.416 mg (20%)

Source: Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kale, 24 Apr 2014 

What are Collard Greens?

Collard greens is an umbrella term used in American English for loose-leafed cultivars of Brassica oleracea belonging to the Acephala Group which also features broccoli and cabbage. Grown for their large, edible leaves, collard greens are widely grown in countries like India, Brazil, Africa, Portugal, Spain, and the southern United States.

The name collard is derived from the term “colewort” which means wild cabbage. Collard greens are biennial where winter frost occurs and perennial in colder countries. With an upright stalk growing up to two feet tall, it features large, loose, dark coloured leaves which do not form a head like in a cabbage. Collard greens are known to be more nutritious and rich in flavour after the first frost during the cold months. Best picked before reaching their maximum size, collard greens are at their texturally best during this period.

Collard greens are known to contain a considerable amount of soluble fibre, vitamin C, vitamin K and also certain nutrient with antiviral, antibacterial, anticancer properties such as diindolylmethane and sulforaphane.

Collards, frozen, chopped, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt

Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)

Energy

151 kJ (36 kcal)

Carbohydrates

7.1 g

   – Sugars

0.57 g

   – Dietary fiber

2.8 g

Protein

2.97 g

Vitamin A equiv.

575 μg (72%)

   – beta-carotene

6818 μg (63%)

Riboflavin (vit. B2)

0.115 mg (10%)

Vitamin B6

0.114 mg (9%)

Folate (vit. B9)

76 μg (19%)

Vitamin C

26.4 mg (32%)

Vitamin E

1.25 mg (8%)

Vitamin K

623.2 μg (594%)

Calcium

210 mg (21%)

Iron

1.12 mg (9%)

Manganese

0.663 mg (32%)

Source: Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collard_greens, 24 Apr 2014

What is the difference between Kale and Collard Greens?

Kale | Borecole | Difference Between     Collards | Difference Between

• The texture and the taste of kale and collard greens is different. Kale is known to be chewier, thicker with a stronger and a more bitter flavour than collard greens.
• Collard features a medium green colour, a smooth texture and an oval shape. Kale has crinkled leaves with darker greyish green leaves.
• Kale packs more calories that collard greens.
• Collard greens are richer in carbohydrates and protein than kale. 

Although belonging to the same cultivar group Acephala of the Brassica oleracea species and thereby also being almost genetically similar, kale and collard greens are indeed two different vegetables that feature different nutrients as well as different uses in cuisine.