Difference Between MMPI and MMPI 2

Key Difference – MMPI vs MMPI 2


 

MMPI and MMPI 2 refer to two psychological tests used in mental health to assess the personality of individuals. However, there is a key difference between these two tests. MMPI 2 or else the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory 2 can be considered as the revised version of the original Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). In the psychological field, MMPI 2 is the most widely used psychological test by professional to assess the condition of individual who suffer from mental health issues. The key difference between the two psychological tests is that MMPI was designed specifically for clinical purposes, but MMPI 2 can be used in other fields as well. Through this article, let us examine the differences that exist between these two tests in depth. First let us begin with the MMPI.

What is MMPI?

MMPI refers to the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. This was published in 1942 by Starke R. Hathaway and John C. McKinley as Medical and Psychiatric Inventory. MMPI is a psychometric test that assists the psychologist to comprehend the varied social, personal and behavioral issues experienced by mental health patients. There is another test known as MMPI-A, which is specifically used for adolescents.

The original MMPI consisted of ten clinical scales. They are hypochondriasis, depression, hysteria, psychopathic deviate, masculinity/femininity, paranoia, psychasthenias, schizophrenia, mania, and social introversion.  Also, there were the validity scales as well which allowed the psychologist to assess the truthfulness and responsiveness of the client.

Difference Between MMPI and MMPI 2

What is MMPI 2?

The MMPI 2 or else the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory 2 came in the form of a revised version of the original MMPI as experts began to realize that it consisted of certain flaws. The MMPI 2 was published in 1989. This consists of 567 questions and it takes about 60 to 90 minutes to complete.

The MMPI 2 also consists of ten subscales that are almost identical to the subscales of MMPI. They are hypochondriasis, depression, hysteria, psychopathic deviate, masculinity/femininity, paranoia, psychasthenias, schizophrenia, hypomania, and social introversion. Also, it consists of seven validity scales as well. Some examples for this are the L Scale, the F-Scale, the K Scale, etc.

The specialty of MMPI 2 is that it is not only used in clinical psychology but other fields as well. For example, in the industrial context the MMPI 2 is used as a tool for screening in certain high-risk professions. Also, in the legal setting, it is used for criminal and custodial care cases as well. Experts highlight that the usage of MMPI 2 in such contexts is questionable.

Key Difference - MMPI vs MMPI 2

What is the difference between MMPI and MMPI 2?

Definitions of MMPI and MMPI 2:

MMPI: MMPI refers to the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory

MMPI 2: The MMPI 2 refers to the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory 2 which is a revised version of the original MMPI.

Characteristics of MMPI and MMPI 2:

Publication:

MMPI: This was published in 1942.

MMPI 2: This was published in 1989.

Test:

MMPI: MMPI was initially introduced as a psychological test, but this was revised later on as MMPI 2.

MMPI 2: MMPI 2 is the most widely used psychological test to assess mental health.

Subscales:

MMPI: Hypochondriasis, depression, hysteria, psychopathic deviate, masculinity/femininity, paranoia, psychasthenia, schizophrenia, mania and social introversion are the ten subscales of MMPI.

MMPI 2: Hypochondriasis, depression, hysteria, psychopathic deviate, masculinity/femininity, paranoia, psychasthenia, schizophrenia, hypomania and social introversion are the ten subscales of MMPI 2.

Usage:

MMPI: MMPI was used specifically as a psychological test for clinical purposes.

MMPI 2: MMPI 2 is used in psychological contexts as well as in legal and industrial contexts as well.

 

Image Courtesy:

1. “Physiognomy” by Tom Ordelman (User:Thor_NL) – Own reproduction. [Public Domain] via Commons

2. “Employees discuss in office” by Hillebrand Steve, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service [Public Domain] via Commons