Difference Between Old Stone Age and New Stone Age

Key Difference – Old Stone Age vs New Stone Age
 

Although it can sometimes be confusing, the Old Stone Age and the New stone age refer to two different periods of human history between which a key difference can be identified.  The Old Stone Age is considered as the oldest period of human existence where stones were first used as tools. The New Stone Age, on the other hand, shows a much more advanced way of lifestyle of people with advanced stone tools and permanent settlements. Through this article let us examine the difference between the Old Stone Age and the New stone age, in detail.

What is the Old Stone Age?

Old Stone Age is also referred to as the Paleolithic period. This period begins from the very inception of human existence until around ten thousand or twelve thousand years. History bears evidence to the fact that the evolution of the apelike man to the homo sapiens took place during this period of time.  The Old Stone Age is usually distinguished into three different sections as the lower Paleolithic period, the middle Paleolithic period and the upper Paleolithic period.

During the Old Stone Age, humans used stones as tools for various purposes. Their main concerns of life revolved around finding food, shelter and making clothes. Finding food was extremely difficult as people had to either hunt animals or else to gather food for their survival. Stone tools were used to hunt animals, but these were very primitive tools. Stones also assisted humans in making a fire, which is considered as a great achievement of the period.

Humans of the Old Stone Age were mainly nomads who travelled from one place to another in search of food. This is why they didn’t have permanent settlements and lived in huts or tents or even caves. These people travelled in small groups in search of food.

Difference Between Old Stone Age and New Stone Age

What is the New Stone Age?

The New Stone Age is referred to as the Neolithic period. The Neolithic period shows certain contrasts when compared to the Old Stone Age. For instance, during the New Stone Age people began to use much more advanced stone tools which were much sharper and well polished. This was achieved by grinding. Also, people began to create permanent settlements for themselves instead of moving from one place to another. Along with permanent settlements, timber and brick were used for building houses.

The people of the New Stone Age were engaged in agriculture as the climate was much warmer unlike in the Old Stone Age. This was considered as a major improvement, and human settlements were arranged near rivers and other waterways so that the agricultural purposes would be successful. People began to domesticate animals as well. Another difference between the Old Stone Age and the New Stone Age is that unlike in the Old Stone Age where people lived in small groups, in the New Stone Age there were much larger settlements with proper structures.

Key Difference - Old Stone Age vs New Stone Age

What is the Difference Between Old Stone Age and New Stone Age?

Definitions of Old Stone Age and New Stone Age:

Old Stone Age: The Old Stone Age is considered as the oldest period of human existence where stones were first used as tools.

New Stone Age: The New Stone Age shows a much more advanced way of lifestyle of people with advanced stone tools and permanent settlements.

Features of Old Stone Age and New Stone Age:

Terms:

Old Stone Age: Old Stone Age is known as the Paleolithic period.

New Stone Age: New Stone Age is known as the Neolithic period.

Tools:

Old Stone Age: People used primitive tools made of stone and wood.

New Stone Age: People used much advanced sharpened stone tools.

Settlement:

Old Stone Age: People had temporary settlements where they moved from one place to another as nomads.

New Stone Age: People had permanent settlements.

Food:

Old Stone Age: People found food through hunting and gathering.

New Stone Age: Agriculture was a main source of food.

 

Image Courtesy:
1. “Glyptodon old drawing” by Heinrich Harder (1858-1935) – The Wonderful Paleo Art of Heinrich Harder. [Public Domain] via Commons
2. “Néolithique 0001“. [CC BY-SA 2.5] via Commons