Difference Between Passage and Paragraph

Key Difference – Passage vs Paragraph
 

A passage and a paragraph always refer to threads of sentences that are grouped together in a great piece of writing.

A word can always be life……

It can always lead you to, invent a sentence. A sentence then might carry you into a passage and eventually into a piece of writing. Such piece of writing can be an essay, an article, a novel; which builds up as a collection of stories. Just like your daily episodes guides you into a life with bends, words can always take you into a long journey. Talking about the difference between a paragraph and a passage is the same. The key difference between passage and paragraph is that a paragraph is a cluster of sentences grouped under one topic whereas a passage is an extract from a text, novel, story or even a paragraph. Both these words are abstracts of a long process which in literature is called as a writing.

What is a Paragraph?

A cluster of sentences that come under one theme, matter or under one subject is known to be called as a Paragraph. Normally, such paragraph is used as a portion of a formal writing, and it can lead you into a prose, into an essay, and eventually into a great piece of writing. In simple, a paragraph is the main backbone of any literal or non-literal writing. At the commencement of a paragraph, one can always find the topic sentence which starts the paragraph, defines its purpose as a whole in a summary. In any piece of writing such leading paragraph can always guide you into other remaining sentences and the paragraphs which serve to support the topic sentence into conclusion. Likewise, a paragraph always contains five to six sentences including the topic sentence. In simple, a good paragraph always is the growth of a good piece of literal writing.

Difference Between Passage and Paragraph

What is a Passage?

On the other hand, a Passage can be defined as a part of paragraph, a part of a sentence or else it can also be called as a part a few paragraphs. Basically, a passage is an extract from any piece of writing, which is taken to prove something about the present text that is in the process of development. Therefore, it can be used as a brief slice of a work that helps you, in another writing as an attraction, distraction as well as a proof factor, to the being discussed matter or topic.  The length of a passage differs from one context to another and also from one’s purpose of extracting. For an example a passage can be a clause of a sentence, a few sentences or else it can also be a few paragraphs.

When writing articles, essays, and compositions, a passage can always make a difference in the context in terms of making it richer, adding more value to the development and also in terms of making it look comprehensive. Therefore, a writing without an extract or a passage will always be boring and will always look incomplete.

Key Difference Between Passage and Paragraph

What is the difference between Passage and Paragraph?

The following can be shown as a brief comparison of these two words.

Paragraph Passage

Definition

A cluster of sentences grouped under one topic. An extract from a text, novel, story or a paragraph.

Length

One or more sentences. No specific length. (this can be from a sentence to a few paragraphs.)

Logic

Should have a unity or a link between each and every line and also a link between the first paragraph and the next. The unity or the linkage differs in terms of the purpose or the context of the extract. Linkage is not so important.

Rule

Should have at least two sentences. Could contain of one sentence. (depends on the context of the extract)

Origin

The writer Firsthand writing from which the sentences are being extracted.

Purpose

To give a story, description or information on a theme or topic. To cite, prove a fact or several facts of a secondary writing.

Despite all the comparisons both these words a passage and a paragraph always refer to threads of sentences that are grouped together in a great piece of writing.

Image Courtesy:

1. “Parts of a Paragraph” by Enokson, (CC BY 2.0), via Flickr

2. “Luke 24-1-12 Sermon Sketchnote” by Wesley Fryer, (CC BY 2.0), via Flickr