Difference Between Dermal Tissue and Ground Tissue

Key Difference – Dermal Tissue vs Ground Tissue
 

Dermal Tissue and Ground Tissue are two of the three tissue systems that can be found in a vascular plant. The key difference between dermal tissue and ground tissue is that the dermal tissue creates the outer covering of a plant body while ground tissue creates most of the soft internal parts of the plant body.

What is Dermal Tissue?

The dermal tissue consists of a single tissue called epidermis, which makes the outer protective covering of the primary plant body. Epidermis is composed of specialized, flattened polygonal cells. Guard cells, a specialized epidermal cell type occur in all leaves. Extensions of the epidermal cells in the root are called root hairs, which increase the surface area available for absorption of water and minerals to the plant body from the earth. Epidermal cells found in shoots have a waxy cuticle to prevent water loss.

Dermal vs Ground Tissue | Difference Between

 What is Ground Tissue?

Ground tissue mainly consists of most of the soft internal parts of a vascular plant body. Ground tissue is further divided into three types; parenchyma, collenchyma, and sclerenchyma. Parenchyma is the most common ground tissue; this consists of thin-walled cells, which aid photosynthetic and storage tissue. Parenchyma tissue is found in the cortex, pith of stems and roots, leaf mesophyll and flesh of fruits. In addition, the vertical strands of cells in the primary and secondary vascular tissue and the rays (horizontal strands) in the secondary vascular tissue also consists of this tissue. Collenchyma tissue consists of narrow elongated cells with thick primary cell walls. It mainly supports young and growing parts of the plant body and occurs as continuous cylinders or in discrete strands beneath the epidermis in stems and leaf petioles. Sclerenchyma tissue is composed of two types of cells: sclereids and fibres. These cells have lignified secondary cell walls and provide structural support to the plant body.

difference between dermal tissue and ground tisue

What is the Difference Between Dermal Tissue and Ground Tissue?

 Definition of  Dermal Tissue and Ground Tissue

Dermal Tissue: Dermal tissue is the tissue system that make the outer covering of a plant body.

Ground Tissue: Ground tissue is the tissue system that makes most of the soft internal parts of the plant body.

Characteristics of  Dermal Tissue and Ground Tissue

Composition

Dermal Tissue: Dermal tissue consists of mainly the epidermis

Ground Tissue: The ground tissue consists of parenchyma, sclerenchyma, and collenchyma.

Location 

Dermal Tissue: The dermal tissue can be seen in the outer lining of the plant body.

Ground Tissue: The ground tissue can be seen in cortex and pith of stems and roots, leaf mesophyll and flesh of fruits, in some parts of primary and secondary vascular tissue, and beneath the epidermis in stems and leaf petioles

Function

Dermal Tissue:  The dermal tissue protects the internal tissues of the plant, prevents water loss, and controls the gas exchange.

Ground Tissue: Gound tissue carries out the photosynthesis, storage function and provide support for the plant body.

 

Image Courtesy:
“Leaf Tissue Structure” by Zephyris – Own work.  (CC BY-SA 3.0) via Wikimedia Commons 
“Jatropha hybrid – Leaf detail (129 DAS)” by Ton Rulkens (CC BY-SA 2.0) via Flickr